Fishing Tips for Every Angler

Fishing Tips for Every Angler

fishing Tips
Whether you’re freshwater fishing in the heat of the summer or up in Minnesota to go vehicle fishing on ice for a big catch, here are some key tips for the many different fishermen.
• Always use maps when possible to see the depths across the lake or pond you’re fishing in. Try to fish where the water goes from shallow to deep, this is where fish like to hang out.
• If there is any moss in the water, fish near there. Fish like to look for food in mossy areas.
• You’ll get the best catch if you use live bait such as minnows, worms, soft shell, and wax worms. Some also use leeches and frogs when they fish in freshwater.
• Keep your live bait healthy to attract more fish. Always keep live bait out of direct sunlight and in clean water, buy an aerator for minnows and other aquatic bait. Remember that cool water holds more oxygen than warm water.
• Wash your hands very well, as fish will be able to detect the foreign smells even more so in freshwater. Clean your bait and tackle well before you start fishing to rinse off the salt and foreign smells.
• Temperature is very important when fishing, if you’re trying to catch a specific fish, do a little research to see the temps and water depths so you know where they will be most active.
• If you’re going for big fish, make sure you have strong knots. You want a knot that can hold 100% of its strength. Take the time to find the right knot for your goal to avoid letting a big catch get away.
• If you’re travelling for your next fishing trip, take the time to talk to the locals. They’ll know better than anyone where you can find the best fish. If you’re fishing locally, consider joining an anglers club so you can share stories and get even more tips.
• In order to keep recreational fishing (and commercial fishing) going, always use a circle hook! Never keep fish out of the water for longer than you can hold your own breath, and do your best to keep the slime on their body intact. This slime protects them from bacteria and infections.
• If you’re going saltwater fishing, take the chance to soak your rod and tackle in freshwater for two hours or more after your trip to best protect and maintain your fishing tackle!
• If you’re going ice fishing, realize that depth is super important! Check the thickness of the ice for safety. Generally, you can walk on four inches or thicker safely. ATVs and snowmobiles can stay on 5”, cars on 8-12”, and pickup trucks on 14”.
• Ice fishing requires even more patience than other types. The water isn’t as active during the winter, so quick jerks or swings of your rod can mean a lost catch. Always make sure your movements are slow and steady when ice fishing.
• Keep ice shavings over the fishing hole to help keep light from shining in the water; this deters most fish, although the light will actually attract plankton which attracts crappie.
• Putting feed in the fishing hole will attract fish. Even though fish are rather inactive during the winter months, seeing other fish feeding will typically bring them closer.
• Maintenance is important in order to get the longest life out of your rods. Take the time to clean and care for your rods after each use.
• Always store your rods and tackle safely away in a nice, dry place to prevent damage.
• Theft can happen anywhere, if you have a boat with costly gear on it, take the time to lock down your equipment to keep it safe from robbers.
• All good fishermen know to keep out of areas that have been marked with “no fishing” signs, but it’s still a crucial tip in order to protect our waters and avoid fines.
No matter what type of fishing you’re planning to do, make sure to keep you follow all guidelines and local restrictions. Always practice catch and release to ensure the longevity of recreational and commercial fishing for others. Take good care of your fishing tackle, and invest in high-quality rods that will last.
Always do your research. A lot of the maps that offer to tell you about “secret” fishing hot-spots really aren’t that helpful and that information can typically be found online or at your local tackle shop for free.
Finally, talking with other fishermen in the area is a great way to share stories and knowledge. If you’re travelling this summer for a fishing trip, make sure to do some research ahead of time and take a few minutes to visit the local bait shop when you arrive. Most shop owners will happily share their knowledge, especially with novice fishermen. best Fishing tips

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